Posts tagged MAY2018
Urban Harvest STL

What’s the story behind where you are today?  How did you get here?


Urban Harvest STL began as a grassroots initiative to grow food in downtown St. Louis by founder and Executive Director, Mary Ostafi. Her background in architecture and interest in food equity led her to pioneer the building of the first rooftop farm in St. Louis, the FOOD ROOF Farm. This vision took root in the community and over the years has grown from a community garden to several urban farms which are an educational platform for the community and a source of healthy food for underserved people living in nearby food deserts. Collaboration with community partners through growth, distribution and education has allowed our mission to thrive. 


What’s your why? What gets you out of bed in the morning?


All members of our community should have equitable access to fresh, healthy food regardless of one's  socioeconomic status, race or location. In St. Louis, 56% of city residents live in food deserts without access to healthy food within a 1/2 mile of their home. Food deserts most commonly affect people from lower socioeconomic status and people of color who don’t have access to culturally relevant food. Urban Harvest STL believes that through partnering with local visionaries and community leaders we can change these statistics turning food deserts into food forests one seed at a time.

What’s on the list for today? What’s next? Where do you hope on going?


As we grow, our community grows. Our goals are to further develop our partnerships through collaboration efforts such as the Veggie Bike. Launched just this past spring, the Veggie Bike is a partnership with St. Louis Metro Market to bring farm fresh produce from our farms into neighborhoods without grocery stores to build community around food and direct people toward the full service St. Louis Metro Market food bus parked nearby. We also plan to further our education programs as we see the next generation take root in the vision of local farms creating an equitable food system in St. Louis. 

What’s one thing that you’d like people to know?

   
We often think of deserts in terms of desolation. But just as deserts have a living, thriving ecosystem, we know there is power, history, and vibrancy in the people and communities that constitute food deserts. It is our passion to work together as a community centered on one mission that will have a truly regenerative impact. 
As you seek to plant seeds in your city, follow the model of nature, an abundance of diversity gives way for unity.

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Square Roots • Sarah Ann Horton

What’s the story behind where you are today?

My farming career was definitely not linear. I grew up on a farm but my family weren't farmers. I started farming professionally about 7 years ago on an organic farm near my hometown. In that time, it wasn't nearly as easy for a young person to learn how to farm so I traveled throughout the Southeast whenever I had time off from college just finding different people to work for. Eventually farming started to pop up in Atlanta and I got into urban farming. I volunteered a lot, mostly because there weren't jobs yet as it was so new to the city, just hoping to learn more. Eventually I got a job as an assistant manager at a lettuce farm focused on job training in the parking lot of an old general motors factory using a mix of soil and hydroponics. This is when I finally got to apply my years of accumulated knowledge. I eventually ran the company before moving to Brooklyn. By the time I moved, I was ready for a new challenge and started with Square Roots in January. I'm not actively farming as much as I'm supporting others while they learn to farm. But I'm also in the role where I'm helping define what Square Roots is so I'm always asking, "How did I get here? What tools helped me succeed?" Farming is an incredibly hard thing to learn, even harder as a career, and I'm lucky that my experience has been full of kind people willing to help me. I really try to perpetuate that professionally. 
 

What’s your Why?

Farming started as the only thing in my life that made sense. It was truly a selfish pursuit initially because it was what I loved to do more than anything else. I never had an end goal and I still honestly don't. I just keep asking myself if I'm adding something of value to the industry and check in with myself to make sure it feels right to me. I'm not actively farming right now, which is a challenge within itself; but I'm raising the next generation of farmers, which holds equal importance to me. Learning how to build a business that follows its mission while creating an environment for people to thrive has been my personal challenge the last few years. 

What’s on the list for today? What’s next?

Well today, is Monday so it's a harvest day. Monday is always a harvest day. But we're also ramping up for season 3. Square Roots has a program where we teach people how to farm and run a business over the course of a year. The program manager and I also started a 6 month apprentice program this year that focuses on job readiness. The company is less than 2 years old so we're still really deciding what we are and how to prepare people best for a career in farming. That's been my priority. One of the best ways to teach people to farm is by being a good example. Make sure tasks are reasonable, respect peoples time, create spaces and systems that are functional and user friendly. Beyond that, there's a whole set of values in farming, particularly the idea of being a steward to the land. How do you instill values in young farmers? How can you be a steward when you grow in a shipping container? These are questions I face daily and hope to implement in the coming season. 

Beyond that, I am not sure what I hope so next. I spent for many years asking myself "What do I need to learn next?". I still had that mindset when I got to Brooklyn but I made a very actively decision to stop asking myself that question. Instead, I just decided to be open. New York City has a rich agricultural history that I am new to. I've just been trying to get the lay of the land and meet other farmers, both in soil and hydroponics. I want farming to grow as a community and an industry and having a thriving network of farmers is really important to the perpetuating that so I'm just trying to get to know my neighbors. I'm sure I'll have an answer one day to what's next, but right now I'm just trying to be present. 

What’s one thing that you’d like people to know?

Something I've been thinking a lot about is the value of a farmer. Yes we understand they grow food and we all eat food but how are farmers truly quantified? In a capitalist system, you have to have a trained labor force for anything to be a primary circuit in the economy. How are we training these farmers? Secondarily, for any labor force to grow there has to be incentive. And while passion is the main driver of new farmers, passion does not pay your bills. The truth is, farming as a career is unsustainable to people who participate. We don't have healthcare, benefits, retirement, or even fair wages most of the time. You often sacrifice your health to provide sustenance for others. Working over 60+ hours a week is the normal and then where is your time for personhood? For unwinding, hobbies, or relationship building? Beyond that, there's general amenities unavailable in a farm environment. Things like restrooms, meals, and even someone to report sexual harassment to. These challenges are not exclusive to either soil or hydroponics but I would say they're more prominent in soil farming. 

In summary, farmers are not culturally or economically valued. We have designed food to be cheap and that has affected people's ability to thrive in the industry. Going to your local farmer's market is great but it's only moving the dial so much. It still takes 5+ years of minimum wage farming to even begin to feel qualified to run your own farm. And the risk of burnout is extremely high. This has to change. I don't have an answer but I think anyone interested in farming should be aware of this. Ask your local farmer about their challenges. Dig beyond the complaints about late blight coming early, aphids they can't get rid of, and the tractor breaking at the most inconvenient time. Ask them if they've had a night off, spent time with loved ones, or gone on vacation. Ask them if there's space in their life for more than farming.

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@Really_Really_Lizzy • Liz Sparacio

What’s the story behind where you are today?

I love interiors. Always have, always will and I’m truly fascinated by what others choose to be surrounded by in their homes! Before I landed where I am today, I previously worked as a home decor merchandiser for large retailer. While I worked in a field that I loved, I felt disconnected from the huge trend driven environment and lacked the authenticity I craved from helping those achieve their own unique style in their homes. And not to mention, I lived in a small, dark, and completely houseplant free apartment! Flash forward, I left what I then thought was my forever career to join the small business community selling vintage furniture/decor and moved into an open, light filled loft!  Transitioning into a new career and filling my new home with pieces I loved was easy, but something was still missing. So, I bought a houseplant, and I killed it almost immediately. I had no idea what I was doing, but my houseplant journey had begun!

What’s your Why?

At first, I wanted houseplants exclusively for aesthetic reasons. Dividing space in a loft can be tricky, and I needed them to serve a purpose other than just being beautiful! I tried (and failed) to make them live in certain spots where they just couldn't get what they needed to thrive. I was determined to make it work, and I finally decided to really dig in and do the research on what types of plants would fair well in a space like mine which has LOTS of direct light and very drastic indoor temperature changes depending on the season.  My trials continued, and in turn, my failures became fewer and fewer, but most importantly, I paid attention to each individual plant's needs. I never expected to take to plant parenthood, especially since I originally just wanted them to fit into the vision I created in my head as space filler, but the gratification of not only creating an enjoyable living space, but also helping something actually grow, is unlike any other hobby I have!

What’s on the list for today? What’s next? Where do you hope on going?

I’m that person. I want to talk about my houseplants all the time. Luckily, social media has been great outlet for like minded plant folks to ask questions, share successes or tips, and grieve over failures together. I put mine out there, and I never expected for people to actually be interested in my home and my plant family! I wasn’t in-tune to this world a few years ago, and it really opened my eyes to the fact that everywhere around me, there are so many people who are interested in expanding their plant collections or longing to care for a houseplant for the first time! Sadly, without use of a car, there aren’t that many places within the city to purchase houseplants, so as a trial last year, we started carrying a small assortment of plants to sell in our vintage shops from local farms and nurseries, and the reactions from the customers and neighborhoods outstanding! What started out as an experiment grew quickly, and I now I visit these local farms weekly to ensure that our stores always have a fresh assortment of plants in need of new homes! I couldn’t be happier to talk about love for interiors, furniture, and houseplants all in the same breath!

What’s one thing that you’d like people to know

We all want immediate gratification, but it’s fleeting. I bought and killed more plants than I should admit before I adjusted my attitude and gave them the care they deserved. Every plant that enters into your home brings a different challenge and in turn something new to learn! Not every plant is going to survive, and that’s perfectly okay, now you know a little bit more for next time! Most importantly, being honest with yourself about the type of care you can provide is key. Are you neglectful and going to forget to water? Hey, there are some plants that won’t mind that! Lack of indoor light? There is still a plant for you and artificial lighting options that can help! Know what you are working with and give it a try! There are so many outlets for support along the way and worst comes to worst, I will happily adopt your unloved plant!

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Moon Hooch • Michael Wilbur

What’s the story behind where you are today?

I found an interest in sound at an early age. There are tapes that I made when I was four years old of bird sounds from my back yard. I remember being fascinated with the intricate patterns they flawlessly produced. At eight I began playing saxophone and took to it very naturally. I found that it was an easy outlet for my pent up emotional energy and continued to develop it through guided training. At 19, I moved to NYC and met James and Wenzl. We began playing on the streets/subways together and almost overnight developed an underground following. Soon we began touring around the country and now, internationally. 

What’s your Why?

It depends on the day. Some days I don’t get out of bed. Generally I have a feeling of purpose beyond this realm of existence. I don’t have much interest in the material world and would rather spend my time exploring and developing things within myself. If I am to leave anything behind for others to experience, I want it to have depth and purpose beyond the surface of appearances in hope that it can catalyze growth in those who experience it. 

What’s on the list for today? What’s next?

At the moment I am on a flight to London to play a show. I look forward to returning to New Bedford to take boxing lessons and be with myself.

What’s one thing that you’d like people to know?

You can only change yourself. If you manage to reflect and become the person you want to be, you will inspire the world to change with you. Life is going to throw a sack of shit in your face. If you know how to clean it up without lighting it on fire, chances are you’ll be alright. 

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Coeur et Sol • Chelsa Hernandez

What’s the story behind where you are today?

It’s a long, winding path that led me here. I’ll spare you the superfluous details and just say this: I grew up in rural NJ on a small family farm. I grew up digging in the dirt, riding horses, raising dairy goats, and selling farm fresh eggs at the end of the driveway.  As I grew older, I tried out many different paths, my last one a straight track to corporate fashion in NYC.  Ultimately, I had the realization that I needed to go back to my roots who I truly am.  Planted in East Orange, a quick 25 minute train ride from Manhattan, I found a vacant lot and started my plans to grow my urban farm!

What’s your Why?

My why is simple. It is to feed the community and to grow produce organically and sustainably. At least, that’s what it started as.  As my first season has progressed, I have built many beautiful relationships with my surrounding community and truly love having the children (and adults!) in the neighborhood stop by to learn a little bit about how food is grown.

What’s on the list for today? What’s next?

Today we are trying to get through all our bed prep work to make sure we get all of our tomatoes and other crops out on time.  We are also working hard preparing for our first CSA share next week!  Next is (hopefully) bountiful harvests and plenty of weeding.  For our second growing season, we hope to hire a Farm Assistant.  We are also working on some other projects that are too young to talk about— but we are so excited for what is to come!

What’s one thing that you’d like people to know?

That we CAN change our food system.  It will take a lot of time, but there have been generations of amazing farmers preparing the landscape for what is happening today.  The solution to hunger and health isn’t to step back and allow industrial farming to expand (and create more and more food waste!), the solution is to start farming. We need more small, family farms.  We need to take the lead to inspire and educate new, young farmers.  All it takes is to start somewhere!

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Terra Luna Herbals • Elise Hanks

What’s the story behind where you are today?

My Terra Luna story started when I graduated college and came to the realization that he industry I had intended to enter (fashion) was really not for me. On a whim, my dear friend, who was experiencing similar misgivings, set off on a trip to volunteer on some vegetable farms in Colorado and Arizona. After experiencing organic farm life, we were hooked! When  returned to Philadelphia, I got an apprenticeship on a flower farm and began taking herbalism classes. The rest naturally came into place. 

What’s your Why?

My garden!

What’s on the list for today? What’s next?

Growing my business to the point where I can expand to a larger plot of land to grow on. The goal is always to connect client with what the natural world has to offer - expanding my base is always on my mind. 

What’s one thing that you’d like people to know?


Using herbs and plants in general for medicine, both physical and mental is such a gift - it’s all there for us, growing from the Earth! We just have to change our habits and empower ourselves to take control of our own health. Start with herbal tea!

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Honey Girl Grows • Robin Jones

What’s the story behind where you are today?

I had a great career as a creative director branding and creating ad campaigns for big agencies. Then a car accident landed me with anxiety that worsened over years, and a second LA rear-ending eventually graduated me to panic attacks and hallucinations before I was finally diagnosed with severe PTSD. I was disabled for two years, then got extremely lucky to find help and recovered 100% in just two years (thanks to a somatic method from the Trauma Resource Institute). I was so damn grateful to get my life back, there was no way I was returning to work inside an office again. I launched my business designing culinary gardens and apiaries for residents, hotels and corporate and never regretted it.

What’s your Why?

Bees are some of the most fascinating creatures on the planet, they just amaze me. Putting friendly bee species apiaries on hotels and designing guest programming around them and educating the public is so much fun, but designing culinary gardens for chefs is equally exciting. Chefs and home cooks see food differently, “get” and match my passion for growing exotic ingredients, edible flowers, organic practices, the difference good soil makes in flavor. And each chef takes our collaborations and creates thoughtful, conceptual art on the plate. And this is the stuff that gives me goosebumps.

What’s on the list for today? What’s next?

A current and exciting not-for-profit project includes a visionary young corporal on a military base and involves bees and gardens. Can’t say more than that just yet.

I’m also about to put culinary gardens and the only apiary, on a hotel in Orange County. Unlike the small “PR” garden beds at another OC hotel, this will be a sizable garden the kitchen and bar will regularly harvest, with guest experiences custom designed around the gardens and bees. 

I’m also working on a kitchen garden for a hotel in Newport Beach with a chef previously from Alinea, and can’t wait to see what she does with our ingredients. I just completed a sustainable edible garden design for Red Bull Corporate in Santa Monica, using what was previously a completely dead space. The 3-bin compost system and worm bins take the company’s paper, and restaurant’s food waste full circle, returning as rich soil that feeds herbs, greens, Alpine strawberries and more. Hopefully we’ll be adding bees next year. 

I pinch myself that I’m returning to corporate thru gardens, and getting people outside and connected to their food, bees and nature. 

Bigger picture, I hope my work with chefs, residents and corporate gardens plays a tiny part in shifting our food system away from monocrops (growing only one type of crop), which will benefit  all animals and ecosystems. I believe chefs hold the power to influence this change and are, already.

What’s one thing that you’d like people to know?

Don’t wait a minute to chase your joy. My family owns @WhiteFishStage organic farms in Montana (follow them!), my aunts are homesteaders, and I grew up with chickens and a greenhouse, cooking/baking with my mom from our tiny garden. Despite a lifetime of gardening, for years I didn’t think knew enough to launch my business. It took losing everything before I found the ovaries. I doubted myself so hard, I went to volunteer at a local farm before I’d be convinced I wax ready. On the farm (for almost a year), I learned very little. It was the most ass-kicking lesson. I watched the farmer (who I adored) till the soil repeatedly with each crop, and finally realized I knew way more than I thought knew and was beyond ready. (No Till people. Give your hoe to your enemy.)

I wish I’d made the leap years ago. I absolutely love my job.

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Honey Truck Co. • Danielle Brooks

What’s the story behind where you are today?

I love drinking tea, especially with honey. One day I had the thought of how awesome it would be to have my own hive to harvest from. I checked out every book I could from the library about bees and keeping them.  Once we got our ducks in a row, I got on a list to get a beehive, and we waited…. In April of 2016 I got my first beehive. I drove up to Jacksonville and they just put the beehive in my trunk and I drove home with them. I had no experience, and jumped in head first.

What’s your Why?

The average age of a beekeeper is 57.  I just turned 30. I love being a young beekeeper because I get to be in the forefront on implementing change. The social, economic, and environmental landscape is rapidly changing and beekeepers are facing more challenges that ever.  There’s a need for a new generation of beekeepers. Younger beekeepers often have an innovative way of approaching problems as they arise.

What’s on the list for today? What’s next?

Today's to do list consists of getting ready for a pop up shop tomorrow at a local farmers market. I have to make more lip balm, pack the truck, do inventory, answer emails, work on social media posts, etc. The list is always endless and always different. I love that no two days of being a beekeeper are the same.

Ultimately, years down the road, I hope to franchise. The Honey Truck Company is an easily replicated model. It not only provides pollinators for an urban setting, but it also educates people on the importance of bees and buying a truly local product.

What’s one thing that you’d like people to know?

While honey bees are often in the spotlight of pollination, native bees are just as important to our ecosystem. Honey bees were imported from Europe in the early 1500s and are not native to America. In Florida alone there are over 319 native species of pollinators. Of those species, 27 of them can only be found in Florida and no where else in the world. That's crazy! We should work hard to protect those little critters. So while the honey bee is at the forefront of my business, I also give voice to the native pollinators as well.

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Growing Back To Eden • Nick Ager

What’s the story behind where you are today?

For as long as I can remember I was always doing something that would give me the title of a "gardener" or even a "steward of the land". However it wasn't till just a few years back that my passion and love for growing food, and working WITH the land grew... And it grew fast!

My first real garden was simply just a two foot by fifty foot bed that ran the length of a backyard fence and followed Back to Eden gardening principles. That little garden grew a lot of stuff in it too! It was that very garden, well right next to Paul Gautschi's garden of course, that inspired me to teach and spread the word of BTE gardening!

When the opportunity came up to start a BTE garden on the farm where I worked, I was well-prepared. After work each day I was out there putting together a roughly 1500 square foot plot! This season will be my first year growing in it and I'm extremely excited to see what it blesses me with!

What’s your Why?

People are always shocked when they hear that I'm only 18 and do all that I do, at such a young age! But when you are truly passionate about something, age is seriously just a number. Unlike the majority of kids my age, I'm excited to get up early each morning and go work, and then go work some more and spend time with the animals until it gets too dark to do anything else.

I enjoy having to go take care of things like a garden or livestock each day. In my opinion, it's cool to think that if I don't get up each morning to go take care of the animals and tend to the garden then they won't take care of me in return. I feed, and provide a happy and healthy living environment for the animals, and they (well the majority of them anyways) provide me with either eggs, meat, or even a free source of pest control!!

What’s on the list for today? What’s next?

As much as I would love my 1500 square feet of heaven, I still have a dream of moving away from the east coast of Maryland to the PNW in Washington! So hopefully one day I will be able to find a property where I can grow my garden have an amazing orchard like my mentor Paul Gautschi's, and bring people out to teach them about gardening, homesteading, and living a simple and sustainable lifestyle!

What’s one thing that you’d like people to know?

When raising and growing your own food and living a self-sufficient lifestyle, it's not always going to be easy. As a matter of fact it will be hard most of the time.

You will come across many obstacles, but the only way you can truly be successful is if: one, you obviously never give up and keep trying again until you get it right, and two, you have faith! You need to have faith that whatever your doing will work out and that all of your hard work will pay off in the long run!

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Verdura Culinary Design • Sara Gasbarra

What’s the story behind where you are today?

I literally grew up in a garden. My earliest childhood memories are of spending time with my father (who was born in Italy) tending our tomato and basil plants.  My maternal grandparents had a summer lake house with a large garden and I would spent part of the summer there picking beans, learning how to compost the catfish we would catch off their pier and seeding all sorts of colorful flowers. I’m often asked if I went to school for agriculture and my answer is no - I simply grew up with this. Having access to a garden as a child influenced me in countless ways both professionally and personally. I can’t stress the importance of teaching children to garden.  It impacts the food choices we make as adults, encourages a healthier lifestyle and fosters a deep appreciation for seasonality, conservation and treating our planet kindly.

What’s your Why?

My “job" is my favorite pastime.  Prior to starting my business seven seasons ago, I had a pretty boring, uninspiring desk job. I dreaded getting out of bed each day, hopping on the train into downtown Chicago and walking into a stale office building. In the spring en route to my office from the train station, I would stroll past landscape companies planting gorgeous vegetation along Michigan Avenue and I was admittedly quite envious of the workers.  I would think to myself, “How do I get to do this?” I wanted so desperately to be outside, working with my hands, creating beauty from plants.

Flash forward several years later, I took some big career risks and figured out a way to make that a reality.  It hasn’t been perfect and its still fraught with the stresses of building a small business, but being outdoors each day is the best kind of remedy for that stress. I have fun every day I’m working.

What’s on the list for today? What’s next?

Two years ago I launched my culinary gardening business in Nashville. I’m now working with chefs and restaurants in Chicago and Nashville and splitting my time between both cities. My goal is to cultivate more projects in Nashville and embrace the slightly longer growing season.  I will always have one foot in Chicago as I have some incredible anchor projects there. Both cities are unique and offer me very different opportunities. My long term goal is to create a consulting arm of my company so that I can assist chefs and restaurants beyond Chicago and Nashville realize their gardening goals. I’m developing a project model that can be easily applied and executed whether you're a small independent neighborhood restaurant or a large scale hotel.

What’s one thing that you’d like people to know?

People often think they need a vast space to cultivate a garden and of course that’s not true.  When working with restaurants, the spaces we have at our disposal are often pretty unconventional and challenging - I set up gardens in city alleyways, on rooftops and on balconies. You don’t need beautiful yard or a larger parcel of land to cultivate a successful garden.  There are so many products out there to help transform an odd space into a beautiful and productive garden. And even just a few simple pots of herbs can make an impact. People assume because I run a gardening business that I must have a large scale home garden and I don’t.  I’ve always lived in the city and tend a very small scale, but productive garden plot. It amazes me what you can grow in a tiny space - a lot more than you think!

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Philly Foliage • Nick Pileggi

What’s the story behind where you are today?
Truly a sequence of wrong turns. From school into my work life, I was always making the choices that felt right at the time but ultimately ended up wrong. My hobbies that I absolutely loved would become nothing more than mundane tasks, and it was unsettling to feel like the things I used to enjoy were constantly losing their luster. Little did I realize, all while I was struggling to feel like I had a true passion, one was growing. Literally.

While in college, a friend was over my apartment for the first time and asked why I didn’t have any plants. And I really didn’t know the answer, since gardening was something I loved doing with my dad as a child. That weekend, I went to a local hardware store and picked out a plant, which was a Dracaena fragrans or a “Corn Plant”. It made me so happy! I had no idea a single plant could have such an effect on me. That was the first houseplant of now over 120, and I would undeniably be lying if I said I was even closed to being finished; I really don’t think I’ll ever stop acquiring plants! It was definitely my love of plants but lack of actual plant friends that inspired me to turn to social media. The houseplant community that has developed on platforms like Instagram and YouTube is absolutely incredible, and I am so grateful to be a part of it.

I would say, overall, I get where I am and grow as a person by taking everything one step at a time. It’s important to walk from point A to point B. This gives you time to process and to prepare. If you run, you’re just going to be tired before you even get there.

What’s your Why?

Besides my cat physically nudging me out of bed to feed her every morning as well as all of the plants I have to water, I’m so in love with the idea that we never know what each day has in store, whether it’s the people we’ll talk to, the things we’ll do, the connections we’ll make. Of course, we have some control over the events that are molded into one day, but it’s the unexpected happenings that truly excite me to the core. These events are also the ones that I believe help shape us as overall individuals.

What’s on the list for today? What’s next?

Today is all about the plants, baby. Now that it’s spring, I’ve been keeping myself busy with my indoor garden, and am hoping soon to get started on a small outdoor garden now that I have an outdoor space to utilize. As a plant parent, each day involves the obvious: watering, examining leaves, rotating pots. Then, there are the choices you make with your plants today that are for the future, like pruning to encourage more growth, or propagating to create new plants.

Speaking of the future, I have some ideas to put into fruition. As I mentioned before, I like to take everything one step at a time, but I definitely would like to begin to feature some other “plant people” of Philadelphia to show off their coveted houseplant collections and hear their words of wisdom. Everyone has such a different story, and I would really love to give people an opportunity to share.

What’s one thing that you’d like people to know?

You don’t have a black thumb! I hear so many people say “I love plants, but I always kill them!” Let me just say, I have killed my fair share of plants. In fact, I can’t even count how many I’ve killed, but I always try to learn something from it (i.e. Did it die from overwatering? Neglect? Too much or too little light?). And I totally get that some of us are so busy with work and social lives that it can be hard to keep up with houseplants, often leading to either overwatering or under-watering. My word of advice is, if you find your plants dying from neglect, try out a Snake Plant. On the other hand, if you think you might be a little heavy-handed with the watering can, I’d consider a Prayer Plant (one of my favorites!). Caring for houseplants and watching them grow is so unbelievably rewarding and exciting, it’s something I want to encourage everyone out there to experience.

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